Fruits & botanics

We believe that each of the 5 corners of Brazil has a unique richness, which we aimed to extract through the art of alchemy and distilling.Have you ever tried the cashew fruit? We obviously use juniper berries and coriander seeds, but we also found unique ingredients to substitute the traditional botanicals Rob would use in his gins.Imbiriba, Puxuri, Pacová, Bergamot, Lemon Clove, Aroeira, Angelica, Laurel and a brazilian Hibiscus. All natural, dehydrated and crushed by hand.The cashew fruit has a prominent role: juicy and astringent, brings the sweetness and sensual scent of Brazil.
 

Juniper berries

Our juniper berries actually come from Europe as for now we haven't found a quality supplier in the tropics.

Coriander seeds

Our supplier is a family in the North of the country.

Cashew Fruit

In the indigenous Tupi-Guarani language "caju" means "a nut which grows". Originally from the Brazilian Northeast, its aroma is intense and striking, you can feel it whenever you open a bottle of Arapuru.

Imbiriba

A plant common in the Northeast of Brazil. Its fruit resembles cinnamon, being slightly spicy and sweet, the locals use it in confectionery.

Puxuri

A nut quite common in the Amazon region, substitutes the nutmeg. They say that nnature has joined cloves, cinnamon and star anise in one ingredient.

Pacová

In Tupi-Guarani, pacová means "a rolled leaf". Common in southeastern Brazil, in small quantities its leaves give flavor and aroma. We use the seeds to substitute the cardamom.

Bergamot Peel

This unique citrus fruit is the result of spontaneous mutation, discovered in 1940 in Campo do Meio, in the area of the municipality of Montenegro (Vale do Caí, Rio Grande do Sul).

Rangpur Lime Peel

Quite common in the Southeast of Brazil, it is also known as lemon-lime or lemon-tambaqui. Tasty strong citrus fruit whose aromatic, intense green leaves.

Angelica Root

Originally from China, it exudes a pleasant spicy but sweet aroma. When distilled, it adds earthy and slightly bitter taste.

Laurel Leaf

Produced in the Midwest region, but quite widespread in Brazil. Its unique aroma and medicinal properties make it an ingredient present in several local recipes.

Brazilian peppertree

Typical tree in the southern regions of Brazil, the aroeira gives bright red aromatic and sweet fruits.

Hibiscus Flower

Produced in the region of Goiás, it has yellow flowers with a red base, being widely used in cooking. Its leaf is known to locals as “vinagreira”.

Fruits & botanics

We believe that each of the 5 corners of Brazil has a unique richness, which we aimed to extract through the art of alchemy and distilling.Have you ever tried the cashew fruit? We obviously use juniper berries and coriander seeds, but we also found unique ingredients to substitute the traditional botanicals Rob would use in his gins.Imbiriba, Puxuri, Pacová, Bergamot, Lemon Clove, Aroeira, Angelica, Laurel and a brazilian Hibiscus. All natural, dehydrated and crushed by hand.The cashew fruit has a prominent role: juicy and astringent, brings the sweetness and sensual scent of Brazil.

Juniper berries

Our juniper berries actually come from Europe as for now we haven't found a quality supplier in the tropics.

Coriander Seeds

Our supplier is a family in the North of the country.

Cashew Fruit

In the indigenous Tupi-Guarani language "caju" means "a nut which grows". Originally from the Brazilian Northeast, its aroma is intense and striking, you can feel it whenever you open a bottle of Arapuru.

Imbiriba

A plant common in the Northeast of Brazil. Its fruit resembles cinnamon, being slightly spicy and sweet, the locals use it in confectionery.

Puxuri

A nut quite common in the Amazon region, substitutes the nutmeg. They say that nnature has joined cloves, cinnamon and star anise in one ingredient.

Pacová

In Tupi-Guarani, pacová means "a rolled leaf". Common in southeastern Brazil, in small quantities its leaves give flavor and aroma. We use the seeds to substitute the cardamom.

Bergamot Peel

This unique citrus fruit is the result of spontaneous mutation, discovered in 1940 in Campo do Meio, in the area of the municipality of Montenegro (Vale do Caí, Rio Grande do Sul).

Rangpur Lime Peel

Quite common in the Southeast of Brazil, it is also known as lemon-lime or lemon-tambaqui. Tasty strong citrus fruit whose aromatic, intense green leaves.

Angelica Root

Originally from China, it exudes a pleasant spicy but sweet aroma. When distilled, it adds earthy and slightly bitter taste.

Laurel Leaf

Produced in the Midwest region, but quite widespread in Brazil. Its unique aroma and medicinal properties make it an ingredient present in several local recipes.

Brazilian peppertree

Typical tree in the southern regions of Brazil, the aroeira gives bright red aromatic and sweet fruits.

Hibiscus Flower

Produced in the region of Goiás, it has yellow flowers with a red base, being widely used in cooking. Its leaf is known to locals as “vinagreira”.

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